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National Council of Churches Podcast

This is the weekly podcast of the National Council of Churches. Enjoy the best features and interviews from insightful guests from across the ecumenical and interfaith movement.
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Now displaying: February, 2016
Feb 25, 2016

The Mass Incarceration crisis is in the news.  One of the first bi-partisan initiatives to come to Capitol Hill is a sweeping sentencing reform bill that attempts to deal with this crisis.  But there’s another crisis taking place in our prisons, the practice of solitary confinement, which many regard as torture.

In this week’s episode, we’ll talk to Rev. Laura Markle Downton of the National Religious Campaign Against Torture.  She will explain exactly what solitary confinement is, and why the UN’s special rapporteur on torture believes the United States’ practice qualifies as torture.

Feb 18, 2016

In January, while the east coast was being slammed with a major winter storm, scholars and leaders from around the world gathered in Morocco to put the finishing touches on “The Marrakech Declaration,” a groundbreaking statement on the imperative for Muslim-majority societies to protect the rights and freedoms of religious minorities.

In this episode we will hear from three leaders about this document and its importance to interfaith relations across the globe. We will talk to National Council of Churches President and General Secretary Jim Winkler, who took part in the January conference; Dr. Tony Kireopoulos, our resident scholar and expert on interfaith relations, and Catherine Orsborn, Director of the Shoulder-to-Shoulder initiative, a program that works to end anti-Muslim sentiment in the US.  We’ll take a look at the Marrakech Declaration and discuss its importance to the current religious and political climate both domestically and internationally.

Feb 12, 2016

Recently the United States Postal service unveiled a new stamp featuring an important African American leader.  This was the culmination of years of effort to have Richard Allen, founder of the African Methodist Episcopal, or AME Church, recognized in this manner.

In this episode we will hear the story of how this effort came to fruition, what it means for the AME church, and its importance to the ecumenical movement.  We will be joined by Jackie Dupont-Walker with the Social Action Commission of the AME Church, and Rev. Joan Brown Campbell, former General Secretary of the National Council of Churches.

Feb 5, 2016

When you turn on your tap water, do you take for granted the clean, fresh water that comes from the faucet?  Have you ever imagined it being so dirty, so toxic, that you couldn’t drink it at all?  Can you imagine not being able to bathe or shower in clean water?


For many persons living in the United States today, what comes out of the tap is a nightmare.  For them, the government has failed in delivering one of its most basic services.  Most recently the town of Flint, Michigan, has experienced a crisis of stunning proportions, as extremely high lead levels make tap water undrinkable.  This has exposed a serious crisis in American life, as many communities are served with tap water that is unsafe.

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